September 3, 2015

7 Rising Art Stars To Watch: Jack Early

"It’s possible Jack Early is the art world’s best living poet.

There’s no single interpretation for every story he tells, song he sings, and artwork he builds. A musician in his own right, Early weaves melodies into all of his semi-autobiographical installations, which use 60s and 70s culture as its raw material. Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono, the show “Laugh-In”, and Pink Floyd’s prism, all become actors to build a mood—usually, a kind of heavy-hearted sweetness. In a recent installation,WWJD, which was shown at Frieze in 2013, Early presented a Jesus Christ, from the 1970s musical “Godspell,” on a neon cross; Early’s own Led Zeppelin-esque ballad drifted over the installation’s clouds from an ipod SoundDock. The title suggests “What Would Jesus Do?” but it could just as easily be interpreted as “What Would Jack Do?” The idea of redemption resonates with Early’s story."
by Paddy Johnson, Whitney Kimball, and Corinna Kirsch

“It’s possible Jack Early is the art world’s best living poet.

There’s no single interpretation for every story he tells, song he sings, and artwork he builds. A musician in his own right, Early weaves melodies into all of his semi-autobiographical installations, which use 60s and 70s culture as its raw material. Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono, the show “Laugh-In”, and Pink Floyd’s prism, all become actors to build a mood—usually, a kind of heavy-hearted sweetness. In a recent installation,WWJD, which was shown at Frieze in 2013, Early presented a Jesus Christ, from the 1970s musical “Godspell,” on a neon cross; Early’s own Led Zeppelin-esque ballad drifted over the installation’s clouds from an ipod SoundDock. The title suggests “What Would Jesus Do?” but it could just as easily be interpreted as “What Would Jack Do?” The idea of redemption resonates with Early’s story.”

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May 22, 2017

Fergus McCaffrey at Art Basel 2017
Carol Rama & Kazuo Shiraga:
Literature of the Flesh

Over the past half decade, the art world has come to celebrate the work of Carol Rama (1918–2015, b. Turin, Italy) and Kazuo Shiraga (1924–2008, b. Amagasaki, Japan). The world gained an appreciation of Rama through her traveling retrospective The Passion According to Carol Rama, which coincided with her death in 2015. Shiraga’s work has risen to prominence in the private and auction markets, alongside major recent shows such as Tokyo: 1955–1970 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Gutai survey at the Guggenheim Museum. In both cases the honors were overdue, one of many qualities they shared. At Art Basel 2017, Fergus McCaffrey gallery (hall 2.0, booth D2) will bring together these two masters for the first time in Carol Rama & Kazuo Shiraga: Literature of the Flesh. Read More
May 19, 2017

Venice conveys the signs of the times

The Business Times by Helmi Yusof

...Another must-see show is Intuition at the Palazzo Fortuny where art-lovers queued for hours to get into. Sprawled over four floors, this gorgeously curated and designed exhibition looks at the role of intuition in the creation of art. One finds exquisite works by Jean Michel Basquiat, Vassily Kandinsky, Girgio de Chirico, Kazuo Shiraga and others juxtaposed with ancient objects and artefacts. Taken together, they illuminate the importance of dreams, telepathy, intuition, magic and fantasy in the making of art. Read More