September 3, 2015

7 Rising Art Stars To Watch: Jack Early

"It’s possible Jack Early is the art world’s best living poet.

There’s no single interpretation for every story he tells, song he sings, and artwork he builds. A musician in his own right, Early weaves melodies into all of his semi-autobiographical installations, which use 60s and 70s culture as its raw material. Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono, the show “Laugh-In”, and Pink Floyd’s prism, all become actors to build a mood—usually, a kind of heavy-hearted sweetness. In a recent installation,WWJD, which was shown at Frieze in 2013, Early presented a Jesus Christ, from the 1970s musical “Godspell,” on a neon cross; Early’s own Led Zeppelin-esque ballad drifted over the installation’s clouds from an ipod SoundDock. The title suggests “What Would Jesus Do?” but it could just as easily be interpreted as “What Would Jack Do?” The idea of redemption resonates with Early’s story."
by Paddy Johnson, Whitney Kimball, and Corinna Kirsch

“It’s possible Jack Early is the art world’s best living poet.

There’s no single interpretation for every story he tells, song he sings, and artwork he builds. A musician in his own right, Early weaves melodies into all of his semi-autobiographical installations, which use 60s and 70s culture as its raw material. Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono, the show “Laugh-In”, and Pink Floyd’s prism, all become actors to build a mood—usually, a kind of heavy-hearted sweetness. In a recent installation,WWJD, which was shown at Frieze in 2013, Early presented a Jesus Christ, from the 1970s musical “Godspell,” on a neon cross; Early’s own Led Zeppelin-esque ballad drifted over the installation’s clouds from an ipod SoundDock. The title suggests “What Would Jesus Do?” but it could just as easily be interpreted as “What Would Jack Do?” The idea of redemption resonates with Early’s story.”

Read More

September 5, 2017

Marcia Hafif: Upcoming Museum Shows in Switzerland

Opening at Kunsthaus Baselland: Thursday 14th September, 6:30 PM

The MARCIA HAFIF exhibition is created in collaboration with the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen (MARCIA HAFIF: September 16-January 14, 2018) and the Kunsthaus Baselland in Muttenz (MARCIA HAFIF: September 15–November 12, 2017).
Hafif (b.1929, USA, living in New York and Laguna Beach) is among the pioneers of the 1970s who fundamentally broadened con­ceptions of the practice of painting and under­standing of art per se. Since the 1980s, terms like ‘radical’ have been used to describe Hafif’s work with monochrome painting. The pencil on paper drawings, vertical pencil marks cover­ ing a surface, begun in 1972, led to the ver­tical stroke in paint. Her work in both mediums still continues, fitting within what she calls The Inventory. Each series included in The Inventory develops a single medium using tra­ditional methods and materials for making paint and preparing a ground. Individual works in a series can be larger or smaller, and usually are made with vertical brush­strokes, with which the effects of unmixed colours on a suit­able painting ground are sounded out. Works from the series that may be her most radical will be exhibited at the Kunsthaus Baselland: the Black Paintings (1979/80) in which she found black by layering ultramarine blue and burnt umber. There will also be photographs and films on display.
Read More
August 24, 2017

Contemporary Art Steams Up the Hudson

The New York Times by Nancy Princenthal

The lovely, spacious Fields Sculpture Park at the Omi International Art Center in Ghent holds nearly 80 works, many installed long term, by Dennis Adams, Donald Baechler, Dove Bradshaw, Folkert de Jong, Donald Lipski, Richard Nonas, Alison Saar and others. The park is open daily. Read More